Invasive Weeds

Invasive weeds are only able to invade because invasive organic nutrient-rich mucky sediment invades first to provide an ideal rooting bed for the invasive weeds to grow in.

The invasive weeds bloom each year and then die of and fall to the bottom where they decompose to produce more organic mucky sediment to grow in the following year, and so the invasion continues and progresses.

Using herbicides to kill off the weeds, just accelerates the process as the dead weeds fall to the bottom and decompose to produce mucky composted sediment.

Our remediation approach is holistic. We improve water quality, manage nutrients and digest away the accumulated nutrient-rich mucky sediment, thus driving back the invasion by reclaiming the areas of the lake bottom that have been taken over by the mucky sediment and invasive weeds that grow in it.
Digesting and eliminating organic sediment in this way is known as bio-dredging.

Because it is a holistic approach, it is effective regardless of what particular kind of weeds have invaded your lake.

Follow the links to learn about our successes with

Milfoil

Milfoil

Watermilfoil (Myriophyllum) is an aquatic plant, different species of which can be found throughout the world. The most common ones in the U.S. are the native Northern Milfoil and the highly invasive Eurasian Milfoil (Eurasian Milfoil has 12-21 pairs of leaflets per leaf, and Northern Milfoil only has 7-11).
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Lilypads

Lilypads

Austin Lake in Kent County, Michigan is a 15-acre lake that has been in the Claus family for almost a century. 

The family bought the property in 1929, and five generations of kids have grown up on the lake, enjoying fishing, swimming and boating.
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Hydrilla

Pondweed & Hydrilla

Roland Lake is a 30-acre recreational lake in Virginia. In 2017 the lake was suffering from a long-term accumulation of mucky, nutrient-rich organic sediment that had allowed excessive dense invasive weeds to grow in virtually all areas of the lake 10 feet deep or less.
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Duckweed

Duckweed & Water Meal

Warmer weather, nutrient inflows, and anoxic conditions create taste and odor problems, and contribute to making reservoir management more difficult every year.

By improving water quality, we reduce treatment costs and mitigate the risks associated with cyanotoxins, disinfection byproducts (DPBs), trihalomethanes (TTHMs), and more.
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